JMG-AD

Research relates symptomatic dizziness to increased risk of death

Research relates symptomatic dizziness to increased risk of death
google news icon

Although dizziness is a common complaint linked to a variety of causes and consequent morbidity, it is yet unknown if symptomatic dizziness is linked to mortality from all causes or just one particular cause.

A recent JAMA Otolaryngoly-Head Neck Surgery study assesses the associations between symptomatic dizziness, its various manifestations, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

Dizziness has a lifetime prevalence of 15-36% and is a widespread complaint in the general population. As a result, it is associated with more healthcare visits, risk of falls, disability, and hospital admissions. Annually, dizziness accounts for 2.8 million visits to the emergency department.

Dizziness can be caused by benign or severe conditions, the latter of which can include brain tumors and stroke. This wide range of factors contributing to dizziness leads to the non-specific property of symptomatic dizziness, which can present in the form of disequilibrium, imbalance, and lightheadedness. Thus, it is imperative to elucidate the underlying causes of dizziness and the manifestations of health outcomes.

Dizziness has a lifetime prevalence of 15-36% and is a widespread complaint in the general population. As a result, it is associated with more healthcare visits, risk of falls, disability, and hospital admissions. Annually, dizziness accounts for 2.8 million visits to the emergency department.

Dizziness can be caused by benign or severe conditions, the latter of which can include brain tumors and stroke. This wide range of factors contributing to dizziness leads to the non-specific property of symptomatic dizziness, which can present in the form of disequilibrium, imbalance, and lightheadedness. Thus, it is imperative to elucidate the underlying causes of dizziness and the manifestations of health outcomes.

The mortality risk was higher among individuals with symptomatic dizziness in the last 12 months, including its manifestations. However, cancer-specific mortality could not be definitively assessed due to the imprecision of the estimates.

When considering diabetes-, cancer-, and cardiovascular-specific mortality, mortality rates risks were higher. Comparatively, mortality risks were not correlated with unintentional injuries.

For all-cause or any cause-specific mortality, individuals reporting positional dizziness were not associated with higher mortality. Symptomatic dizziness, particularly difficulty with balance or falls, was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, as shown by multivariable Cox proportional hazard models. Symptomatic dizziness without falls or balance issues was not associated with an increased mortality risk.

One novel finding of the current study was the association between diabetes-specific mortality and symptomatic dizziness, which could be due to peripheral neuropathy and microangiopathy-induced ischemic changes in vestibular organs that lead to a sense of imbalance. Importantly, cardiovascular diseases or diabetes may induce dizziness through other mechanisms that do not directly contribute to mortality.

Furthermore, reports of dizziness without falls or balance issues were not associated with higher mortality. Physical examination and follow-up questions related to frequency, duration, and characteristics are essential for patients with symptomatic dizziness.

Symptomatic dizziness was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality and mortality secondary to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In the United States, reports of symptomatic dizziness are likely to increase as the population continues to age. Thus, future research is needed to identify interventions for the effective management of dizziness and its effect on mortality.

A key limitation of the current study is that the self-reports are dependent on individual respondent interpretation and recall bias. Additionally, the reports were obtained at the time of NHANES participation.

Data on exact dates and changes in status were unavailable, which could have biased the results. For cause-specific mortalities, such as unintentional injury, the underlying causes could be heterogeneous, and a limited number of events may have led to the lack of associations.

Another limitation is the observational nature of the data, which prevented the establishment of any causal relationships. Questions on dizziness, such as lightheadedness or room-spinning sensation, also lacked clinical meaning.

Despite controlling for major confounding factors and mediators, residual confounding due to other unmeasured factors could not be excluded.

Imperial Hospital Sylhet
Chancery-Solicitors-Ad-banner-v2-updated

Next Post

Daily Dazzling Dawn's Success: 7 Months Statistics

Tue Feb 13 , 2024
We appreciating the massive support and love towards Dazzling-Dawn hence shortest period of time we touched millions. As British Bangladeshi News-Network its a privilege and honour to reach out so many. Our motto is to help and support our society through sharing the truth and positive journalism, reaching out our […]
Daily Dazzling Dawn's Success

You May Like

Subscribe Our Newsletter

Daily Dazzling Dawn is the first and only international and non-profitable newspaper, which is 100% ownership of professional journalists from Bangladeshi origin with 20 years of experience in global journalism. The main aim of the newspaper is promoting ethical journalism with truth, accuracy and proficiency.

Editor in Chief

Dulal Ahmed Chowdhury

Dulal Ahmed Chowdhury is the Editor of The Daily Dazzling Dawn. Previously, he has been serving in important positions in all the famous national dailies of the Bangladesh since the nineties. He has played a commendable role in journalism by participating in various events at the national and international levels. United Nations Conference, World Climate Conference, SAARC Summit are notable among them.

Quick Jump

error: Content is protected !!